Fat man in the bathtub

And I’m sure he would have the blues if he was in this tub.

Just another one of the many old bathtubs found throughout rural areas. This particular one has a spring emptying into it, most likely used for cattle at some point.

© David Guidas

© David Guidas

I can’t show this photo without some Little Feat

Not a poet and I know it

Enough haiku silliness, time to get back to normal photography.

I’m starting off spring with a nice texturally image of old wood and black rubber. I was drawn to this scene because of the old tire that the tree grew around. Although you can’t see it in this photo that is a real 15′ tree, with branches and everything, that the tire is hugging. Judging by that nice wide whitewall it looks like the tire has been around for a while.

This wasn’t an overly colorful scene and I immediately knew it would make a good black and white image because of the textures in the scene and the contrast of the black and white tire. The angled broken barn door only enhanced an already nice rural setting.

© David Guidas

© David Guidas

Drops of winters end (more bad haiku)

Drops of winters end

Adjacent thorns nearly miss

Inverted sun rays

 

Don’t worry, I’ll start writing normal again. ;-)

© David Guidas

© David Guidas

Sunday photo haiku (because I can’t think of anything else)

Arboretum trees

Showing me their cypress knees

A woodland village

 

© David Guidas

© David Guidas

People who need people

I have been looking at a lot of photography lately. And I mean a LOT!  It is my season to enter competitions and, in turn, reviewing the results of past competitions. The one thing I noticed is that judges really like photos with a human element. That’s really great considering I rarely have any people in my photographs. Probably because I don’t photograph around people very often. When I’m in a city environment there’s usually too many people and in order to avoid “crowd” shots, I tend to focus more on details and architecture. When I’m in rural environments I look for just about anything to photograph but people are often few and far between.

Don’t get me wrong though, I do like some people shots. I like street photography only when they are well composed and show the interaction of the person with the environment. I do not like the random “camera at the hip” shots of folks walking on the sidewalk. I just don’t get those. I also don’t care for straight on portraits too often. I do like portraits that show a little bit of the environment, especially if it’s an “exotic” person and environment (for Americans that’s just about anyone from and in another country). The close-up of the craggily face just doesn’t do it for me, although I have done that kind of shot in the past.

With that, I am going to make an attempt to add some humans to my photography this year. I’m not doing it to win any contests, I’m doing it as a self challenge to broaden my scope. How I am going to go about it I don’t know. I am not going to copy any kind of style, I’ll just wing it as usual but I kind of know what I want. I actually “saw” a few good photos the past year that would have included people but I never followed through on them. In my head I’m already there.

So, here’s looking at you (maybe).

 

© David Guidas

© David Guidas

Man of few words

That’s me. Tonight at least.

I shall resume later.

For now a pretty picture.

© David Guidas

© David Guidas

Grazing

Just like the cattle this blog needs constantly fed, and I’m doing a poor job of that lately. My apologies for the lack of new content the past month.

This time of winter is my slow time for photography. A slow time for going out and shooting, even though it can be an incredible time for beautiful images, but a good time to organize my work and placing submissions for competitions. Organizing my work seems to get more daunting as each year passes. I need to find a better way of doing it throughout the year. I’m still coming across older images  that I totally forgot about. My files are the equivalent of that messy desk that guy in the office has.

But that’s what a 6°F day is good for.

© David Guidas

© David Guidas

Cracks in the works

I ran across this tree-like crack in the ice of a very small pond and was drawn to how it was emanating from the small rock at the edge. I think I shot about a dozen different perspectives, some with the rock more prominent, but in the end I liked this “shot from above” look the best.

Processing was another story. I spent a lot of time on this simple shot trying to get the ice bright enough and the contrast levels just right to emphasize the crack. I’m still unsure of the final product, maybe it’s a bit too contrasty, but I had to stop somewhere.

© David Guidas

© David Guidas

 

Oh yeah, about that pod

I honestly thought I would be posting a lot more this year than I have so far. I had all intentions to focus on keeping this blog fresh and exciting but after the holidays I seemed to have gotten extremely busy at my day job getting caught up from the time off and the photography has sort of been almost non-existent.  Throw in the spell of extremely cold weather and my camera has seen little action for a couple of months – although it seems like an eternity.

With no “new” photos in the works I remembered that I was supposed to show more of the seed pod that I featured a couple posts back.  If you recall from the previous post I found this little pod very fascinating in its look and structure and spent some time playing around with various macro shots of it. It’s these details in nature that I like to find and explore more and more. As I looked over the numerous shots I came across this simple composition and wondered how a texture treatment would look, thinking it would add a nice element. At first I stayed fairly conservative, keeping with the warm, subtle tones of the original but as I experimented I found that I kind of liked a little boost in the color and ended up with this almost split-tone image, which makes the pod jump out a little more.

It’s a simple photo of a small thing but the way things look around here in the winter the smaller the area the better.

© David Guidas

© David Guidas

We photographers need to stick together (don’t be a dick)

In the photo below I highlighted the photographer who rudely got into my photo. Although he knew I was setup in that spot taking photos long before he decided to shoot from that point, plus he even glanced in my direction as he was walking towards the shore, he still set up his tripod to shoot without asking if it was in my way.

© David Guidas

© David Guidas

I had walked pass this guy earlier on my way to a lifeguard shack to shoot the sunrise and saw that he had his tripod setup on the beach behind the guard shack. He was using what appeared to be a pro grade Canon DSLR with an L series lens and I was armed with a lowly EOS M camera that by all accounts looks like a simple snapshot camera. I had my camera mounted on a small tabletop UltraPod, which I pack along when I am traveling. The problem with the UltraPod is that there aren’t too many tables on the beach.  I looked around for something solid above ground level to set the tripod on and I thought I would try to use the railing at the guard shack for support. As I walked past the other photographer I held up my miniscule rig and jokingly said to him that I should have brought a bigger tripod. He just looked at my setup and just gave that kind of “why are you even talking to me?” look.  OK, this guy has no sense of humor in the morning I thought.

So I went around to the front of the guard shack and walked up the stairs to the shack deck. With the building behind me I was in no ones way, so I set up my tripod on the railing and proceeded to snap some photos as the sun rose. After I watched in amazement as the other photographer came around and setup right in my way I paused to see how long he stay there and looked around to see if I had other places I could setup. With a tiny tripod I was kind of limited. After a few minutes he finally left and I stayed on the deck of the shack but having moved to the corner for a little better bracing against the strong winds.

After exposing a few more photos I heard someone yelling “EXCUSE ME” behind me. I turned around and yes, it was the other photographer. He was now setup to the right and slightly behind the lifeguard shack and he asked if I could move over behind the structure a little more as I WAS IN THE WAY OF HIS SHOT!! I, who had been in the same place for quite some time was now IN THE WAY of the same guy who rudely got IN MY WAY just a few minutes earlier. Now I am not a mean person and I refrained from arguing with him and bringing up the fact of his faults but I had my tiny tripod on the railing secured only by the pressure of my hand and I couldn’t move it without taking the time to totally set it up again so I told him I couldn’t move my camera and I just turned around and continued to take my photos.

By the way, after the sun started to come up a few more tourists arrived on the beach to snap some photos with their phones. Every one of them noticed me when they were walking by and asked if they were in my way BEFORE they even got in front of me. By then I was done shooting anyhow and it didn’t matter. I then obligingly performed their requests to take their photos with their phones in front of the sunrise. Smiles all around and I forgot all about the other photographer.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 986 other followers